Museum of: Berlin
    Name of the artefact: Female figurine
   
Illustrations of mother deities as a symbol for fertility were widespread in Europe during the Upper Paleolithic und Neolithic periods.
                                 
 
WHERE IS IT AND MAIN CHARACTERISTICS
 
STATE
Department:
Museum for Pre- and Early History
Preservation:
Good
Inventory number:
VIIIa 193a-b
Restauration:
No restored
Name of the artefact:
Female figurine
Completeness:
Complete
Object type:
Human figurine
 
Material:
Clay
Methof of manufacture:
Pottery, formed by hand
Decoration type:
No decoration
Distinctive mark:
Figurine sitting on a throne
DIMENSIONS
 
PERIOD OF USE
Length (mm):
woman 110
Epoque:
Neolithic
Heigth (mm):
woman on the throne 60
Culture:
Cucuteni culture
Diameter (mm):
-
Period:
Upper Neolithic
Width (mm):
throne 48-53
Face:
-
Thickness (mm):
-
Absolute chronology:
4th mil. BC
Weight (g):
112
DISCOVERY
Date:
Bought by the museum in 1917
Country:
Romania
District:
Unknown
Town hall affiliation:
Unknown
Village:
Unknown
Discovery findspot:
Unknown
Condition of discovery:
Unknown
Discovery type:
Other
 
ANALYSES DETERMINATIONS
 
FILLED IN BY
Type:
-
Name:
Dr. Manfred Nawroth
Laboratory:
-
Institution:
Museum for Pre- and Early History
No./Code:
-
Date:
11/11/2005
 
DEEPENINGS

Morphology of the object:

The object consists of two separated pieces, a woman and a throne. Both are damaged on the surface. The female figurine was broken into three pieces and restored. The longhaired woman holds a little child in her arms in front oh her breasts. At the end of the legs there are no feet shown. The throne has a quadratic seat standing on four chair legs.

Decoration:

-

Inscription:

-

Analogies:

Female figurines were widespread from the Middle East to the Mediterranean area and Central Europe in the Neolithic. In South East Europe numerous female figurines were discovered, mostly belonging to the Cucuteni culture. Several were found around a settlement of Cucuteni which was built on a mountain plateau in East Rumania.

Interpretation:

Illustrations of mother deities as a symbol for fertility were well known in the Upper Paleolithic and Neolithic periods.
Bibliography:
-